So today I was playing around in Google Analytics with the content tab, specifically in the in-page analytics insights page.  If you look at the image below you will see that it has little orange numbers on the website.  These represent where people are clicking on your website.  These represent the percentage of the 2500 people that have clicked on the site.  that 30%+ of the people on the site are clicking on the top review.  Obviously this is the most important place on this particular clients website.  Best Cloud Server is a client and awesome to let us share their information.

Interesting Facts Across 90% of our Accounts

  • 90% of clicks are above the fold across all of our websites
  • Average home Text gets 15% of clicks
  • Average Home Logo gets 35% of clicks
  • Anything with “Free” on it will dominate 15%+ of clicks on your site.
  • Average of 10% of clicks are above the fold.
  • About pages typically get 5% of clicks
  • Pricing pages average 15% of clicks

What can we learn from this?

With 90% of all clicks above the fold of the page you have to know that the majority of your website doesn’t even matter if it’s not above the fold.  If your website gets 1000 people coming to it a month with a 50% bounce rate that means that only 1 person a day will visit below the fold of the page.  1 person.  Does your site even get 1000 visitors.  Say it get’s 1000 people a day. That means that 30 people will visit the part of your website that you are not showing when they first load the page.

If you have something important to show on your site you need to show it prominently above the fold when the website first loads.  If you don’t, it won’t get seen by anyone. Use this Google Analytics tool to help your online efforts out.  Use Google Analytics a lot more to find out better insights on what you’re already doing.  This will help you to be more profitable and know what the hell is going on.

John Rampton is a PPC Entrepreneur, Author, Founder at Due a finance company helping small business owners. Follow me on Twitter @johnrampton

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