Google AdWords is the most used pay per click program by advertisers all over the world. Small businesses and big businesses use it to promote their products and services. It provides the best user experience, the most competitive CPC, CTR and CPM. It has the most amount of websites to advertise on thanks to the millions that use Adsense on their website. I did an article abbreviating pay per click last week. I think it’s time we now have an abbreviation for AdWords too seeing as it is a huge part of pay per click and ppc.org. Here are some tips when using AdWords and details about the PPC service too: all from the abbreviation of A.d.W.o.r.d.s.

A dvantage in Advertising – It is clear that Google AdWords is leading the market in pay per click advertising. Not even close alternatives are as successful or have the user ability and features AdWords has to offer. It is a fact that hundreds of millions of advertisers use AdWords from the likes of the biggest brands such as Coca Cola and Nike. Not all of these people can be wrong about AdWords, can they?

 

D irect – With instant results in minutes (a common feature of PPC), AdWords can get you the results you want fast, easy and direct. A campaign can be created in less than 5 minutes. For an advertiser, that is astonishing. No messing about. No scams. Nothing. AdWords has the potential to turn you into a zero to hero advertiser.

 

W aste – This is crossed out as there is no wasting in AdWords. It is cost efficient offering very competitive CPC for adverts. It is considered very time efficient compared to the alternatives to PPC. As well as that, it provides successful results. You can profit from PPC and AdWords far more easier than other forms of PPC programs and PPC alternatives. Just remember the Do’s and Don’ts of PPC

 

Google AdWords + Objectives = Success

O bjectives – It is a must do: objectives and goals. Using AdWords without objectives is like going into a battle without knowing what to do. You need to know what external factors that might affect your campaign,what you want your CPC and CTR to be but more importantly, what you want to achieve through using AdWords. If you don’t have an answer for that, there is no point in spending your money on it.

 

R etain Consistency – (if only AdWords was spelt AdWocds, it would have been a lot easier!) The continual use of consistency when using AdWords is key to making profit through the PPC program.  Once you have optimised your campaign, leave it! Changing and fiddling with it can only make it worse. Small tweaks are fine: there is no such thing as the ‘perfect campaign’.

 

D ecisions, D ecisions,  Decisions! – Making the right choice in PPC to benefit yourself can prove a challenging task. Should you raise your maximum CPC towards Christmas? Should you change your geographic area you target as your market adapts to new technology? These questions can be quite tough to answer. However, if you know the external factors, the Christmas Effect, the types of landing pages, the signs of success in PPC and how social media can benefit your campaign, it will help you move you towards making the right decision.

 

S teps to Creating the Perfect Advert – Without an advert to gain the reader’s attention, your AdWords campaign will be quite inefficient in gaining conversions. I have created an article, ‘[How to] Create the Perfect PPC Advert‘, telling you what you need to do to get clicks without spam.

After completing a Masters degree in Automotive Engineering with Motorsport, Will moved on to work at McLaren. He created AskWillOnline.com back in 2010 to help students revise and bloggers make money developing himself into an expert in PPC, blogging, SEO, and online marketing. He now runs others websites such as PoemAnalysis.com and RestoringMamods.com. You can follow him @willGreeny.

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