Generating Leads 15 May 2012

PPC Tips Written by 0

In the age of so many modern means of communicating, generating the right amount of leads for your business has become easier than ever. Social networking is the best way to communicate with like-minded business professionals who might want to start up a relationship with you. It’s not the only way to increase business though. You shouldn’t rely totally on the internet for generating leads. The old-fashioned methods of getting clients might seem antiquated; however, they still produce results, even if they’re slow to arrive. Many people enjoy seeing those they do business with in person rather than through anonymous means via the internet. You will generate long-lasting relationships with your clients if you show up at their office and talk to them face-to-face. For some businesses, the costs associated with travel are too much to bear. That’s why many businesses these days are more likely to have an email address, contact form, or social networking profile as the sole means to get in touch with them. It’s much easier to go with one of those methods because they don’t require you to have an employee available during business hours to answer questions.

Businesses take advantage of the benefits offered through LinkedIn and Facebook. When looking for new customers, Facebook is the best resource because everyone who might buy your product likely uses it. You might be able to generate some leads through Facebook, but it’s unlikely due to the fact that if a business professional has a profile with them, it’s for their personal use and they want any professional correspondence directed to their LinkedIn page. Everybody who is anybody in business uses LinkedIn on a regular basis. From the CEO to the lowest level employee, you’re bound to find them all on LinkedIn. The main drawback with LinkedIn is that you’re limited in who you can add your profile by how many people you’re connected with. Someone who has a small amount of connections isn’t going to be able to reach everyone associated with the social network. Gathering new connections is difficult since LinkedIn only allows you to add people you already know. If you attempt to expand your network to include strangers, you won’t have much success and they will come down on you before long.

Another way to reach out to unfamiliar clients is through the old-fashioned methods of cold calling or its email equivalent. It doesn’t matter who you’re trying to reach. They will likely have an email address. If they don’t have an email address, they will have a contact form or some similar means to get in touch with them. Don’t limit the amount of people you try to reach. The more people you attempt to make contact with, the higher the chance you will find some decent leads in the process. When someone doesn’t get back to you right away, wait for awhile before you decide to write them again. Communication that’s too persistent will make you look like a spammer and decrease the chance of you getting decent leads dramatically. A steady approach with consistent gaps between communications will produce the best results in the long run.

Lastly, if you can’t connect via social media, your networks or face-to-face there is always the option of pay-per-click (PPC) advertising. PPC advertising allows you to place your message in front of a potential customer right when they’re looking for information, solutions and providers. You control the messaging and the landing page to ensure that you’re providing the right options to the right people at the right time. Add in the fact that you only pay when someone clicks the ad (and visits your site) and you have a highly accountable source of leads.

There are many ways of effective lead generation, try out a combination of different methods and see what works best for your business.

Peter Daisyme is a writer, computer nerd, Virtual Tour Fan, Writer at PPC.org. & Bloggin.org. Follow me on Twitter @peterdaisyme

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